7th Grade  Science

7th Grade Science

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Life Sciences Physical Sciences Science and Technology Scientific Inquiry Scientific Ways
of Knowing


 

Earth and Space Sciences

(Based on the State
of Ohio Standards)
1. Explain the biogeochemical cycles which move materials between the lithosphere (land), hydrosphere (water) and atmosphere (air).
 
  1. Biogeochemical Cycles  You will find a extremely in depth power point explaining this concept.
  2. Biogeochemical Cycles   This is a second power point to express the same Idea.
  3. Introduction to Biogeochemical Cycles.   This is an outstanding hardcopy in Microsoft word on the subject.

 

Gizmos are fun, easy to use, and flexible enough to support many different teaching styles and contexts. 

You will present to your students a visual animated manipulative allowing for an easier and faster teaching pedagogy.

You will discover this tool strategically located throughout the website

2. Explain that Earth’s capacity to absorb and recycle materials naturally (e.g., smoke, smog, sewage) can change the environmental quality depending on the length of time involved (e.g. global warming).
  1. Greenhouse Effect  Within this simulated region of land, daytime's rising temperature and the falling temperature at night can be measured, along with heat flow in and out of the system. The amount of greenhouse gases present in the atmosphere can be adjusted over time, and the long term effects can be investigated.
3. Describe the water cycle and explain the transfer of energy between the atmosphere and hydrosphere.
  1. Water Science for Schools   This site is worth it's weight in gold showing many different ideas of water and how it affects us.  4 Star
  2. Weather animation Comprehensive   This website will allow the teacher to present and the student to view many if not all different forms or weather.  4 Star
  3. Water
    This fantastic site has loads of information on water, the water cycle, water chemistry and properties, and water in nature. Included are online lessons, pictures, diagrams, labs, a dictionary, a review test, and a printable teacher guide in Acrobat format
  4. Water - A Web Quest
    In this web quest students will:
    1. Learn about the 3 states of water.
    2. Discover what a water cycle is.
    3. See where on earth we can find water.
    4. Complete a worksheet and have fun with a water pipe maze
    5. Build your own water cycle.
  5. GLOBE
    GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based education and science program.
    For Students, GLOBE provides the opportunity to learn by:
    Taking scientifically valid measurements in the fields of atmosphere, hydrology, soils, and land cover/phonology - depending upon their local curricula
    Reporting their data through the Internet
    Publishing their research projects based on GLOBE data and protocols
    Creating maps and graphs on the free interactive Web site to analyze data sets Collaborating with scientists and other GLOBE students around the world
    For Teachers, GLOBE provides assistance through:
    Training at professional development workshops
    Teacher's Guide, "how-to" videos, and other materials
    Continuing support from a Help Desk, scientists, and partners
    Contact with other teachers, students, and scientists worldwide.
  6. Tides  Gain an understanding of high, low, spring, and neap tides on the Earth by observing the tidal heights and the positions of the Earth, Moon, and Sun. Tidal bulges can be observed from space, and water depths can be recorded from a dock by the ocean
  7. Water Cycle  Control the path of a drop of water as it travels through the water cycle. Many alternatives are presented at each stage. Determine how the water moves from one location to another, and learn how water resources are distributed in these locations.
4. Analyze data on the availability of fresh water that is essential for life and for most industrial and agricultural processes. Describe how rivers, lakes and groundwater can be depleted or polluted becoming less hospitable to life and even becoming unavailable or unsuitable for life.
  1. Water Science for Schools   This site is worth it's weight in gold showing many different ideas of water and how it affects us.  4 Star
  2. Water
    This fantastic site has loads of information on water, the water cycle, water chemistry and properties, and water in nature. Included are online lessons, pictures, diagrams, labs, a dictionary, a review test, and a printable teacher guide in Acrobat format.
  3. Water Pollution Get to know the four main types of pollution present in the environment, and then look at a variety of real‑world examples as you try to guess what type of pollution is represented by each situation. All of the real‑world situations can be viewed every day in different parts of the world.
5. Make simple weather predictions based on the changing cloud types associated with frontal systems.
  1. Franklin's Forecast This website contains many ideas surrounding the weather.
  2. Educator's Bridge to Science  This web page will illustrate many connections for teachers and students.
  3. National Center for Atmospheric Research   This website will present an almost all inclusive study of the weather.
  4. EdHeads - Weather
    This is a great interactive site where students can learn how to report and predict the weather at the underground W.H.E.D. weather caves!
  5. Coastal Winds and Clouds Learn about atmospheric conditions near a coast using basic observables: wind and temperature. Measure daily temperatures over both land and water near a coastline, along with the wind speed and direction. The conditions can be recorded at a variety of altitudes
  6. Seasons: Why do we have them?  Learn why the temperature in the summertime is higher than it is in the winter by studying the amount of light striking the Earth. Experiment with a plate detector to measure the amount of light striking the plate as the angle of the plate is adjusted (and then use a group of plates placed at different locations on the Earth) and measure the incoming radiation on each plate.
  7. Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun Observe the motions of the Earth, Moon and Sun in three dimensions to explain Sunrise and Sunset, and to see how we define a day, a month, and a year. Compare times of Sunrise and Sunset for different dates and locations. Relate shadows to the position of the Sun in the sky, and relate shadows to compass directions.
  8. Seasons Around the World  Use a three dimensional view of the Earth, Moon and Sun to explore seasonal changes at a variety of locations. Strengthen your knowledge of global climate patterns by comparing solar energy input at the Poles to the Equator. Manipulate Earth’s axis to increase or diminish seasonal changes
  9. Seasons in 3D  Gain an understanding of the causes of seasons by observing the Earth as it orbits the Sun in three dimensions. Create graphs of solar intensity and day length, and use collected data to describe and explain seasonal chang
6. Determine how weather observations and measurements are combined to produce weather maps and that data for a specific location at one point in time can be displayed in a station model.
  1. EdHeads - Weather
    This is a great interactive site where students can learn how to report and predict the weather at the underground W.H.E.D. weather caves!
  2. Weather Maps  Learn about standard symbols used in meteorology to construct weather maps. Rain, sleet, snow, temperature, cloud cover, wind speed and direction, and atmospheric pressure can all be recorded at two different weather stations on a map.
  3. Coastal Winds and Clouds  Learn about atmospheric conditions near a coast using basic observables: wind and temperature. Measure daily temperatures over both land and water near a coastline, along with the wind speed and direction. The conditions can be recorded at a variety of altitudes
  4. Relative Humidity  Measure the temperature on both a wet and dry bulb thermometer to determine the relative humidity over time. The two thermometers show the temperatures as time passes on a clock, and the temperature of a bucket of water can be adjusted to learn about the dew point, condensation, and saturated air.
7. Read a weather map to interpret local, regional and national weather.
  1. EdHeads - Weather
    This is a great interactive site where students can learn how to report and predict the weather at the underground W.H.E.D. weather caves!
  2. Weather Maps  Learn about standard symbols used in meteorology to construct weather maps. Rain, sleet, snow, temperature, cloud cover, wind speed and direction, and atmospheric pressure can all be recorded at two different weather stations on a map.
  3.  Earth Live   View on line real time from a satellite the planet and determine for your self local and regional weather live. 4 star
8. Describe how temperature and precipitation determine climatic zones (biomes) (e.g., desert, grasslands, forests, tundra, alpine).
  1. Biomes of the World
    This site has loads of information and pictures on six biomes and six ecosystems of the world. This is a very in depth but useful site!
  2. Greenhouse Effect  Within this simulated region of land, daytime's rising temperature and the falling temperature at night can be measured, along with heat flow in and out of the system. The amount of greenhouse gases present in the atmosphere can be adjusted over time, and the long term effects can be investigated.
9. Describe the connection between the water cycle and weather-related phenomenon (e.g., tornadoes, floods, droughts, hurricanes).
  1. Hurricane Motion  Use data from up to three weather stations to predict the motion of a hurricane. The wind speed and direction along with cloud cover is provided for each station using standard weather symbols

Life Sciences

1. Investigate the great variety of body plans and internal structures found in multicellular organisms.
  1. Pond Life Videos
    This web site has a fantastic collection of free videos of microscopic pond life. Freshwater ponds provide a home for a wide variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic plants, insects, and animals. The vast majority of pond inhabitants, however, are invisible until viewed under the microscope. Beneath the placid surface of any pond is a microscopic metropolis bustling with activity as tiny bizarre organisms pursue their lives; locomotion, eating, trying not to be eaten, excreting, and reproducing. In this collection of digital movies, observe the activities of microscopic organisms taken from a typical North Florida pond.
  2. Medical Mysteries on the Web   Learn and discover many multicellular organism Discover 6 types of Pathogens.  You will learn what will defeat and what will survive.  4  STAR  Discovered by Mrs. Cleary  St. Francis de Sales
  3. Cell size and Scale    A very neat tool for comparing the size of a coffee bean to the size of an atom. Interactive
2. Investigate how organisms or populations may interact with one another through symbiotic relationships and how some species have become so adapted to each other that neither could survive without the other (e.g., predator–prey, parasitism, mutualistism, commensalisms).
  1. Mutation and Selection   Observe evolution in a fictional population of bugs. Set the background to any color, and see natural selection taking place. Inheritance of color occurs according to Mendel's laws and probability. Mutations occur at random, and probability of capture by predators is determined by the insect's camouflage.
3. Explain how the number of organisms an ecosystem can support depends on adequate biotic (living) resources (e.g., plants, animals) and biotic (nonliving) resources (e.g., light, water, soil).
  1. Rabbit Population by Season   Observe the population of rabbits in an environment over many years. The land available to the rabbits can be adjusted, as well as the weather conditions, in order to compare the effects of urban sprawl and unusual weather on wildlife populations.
  2. Effect of Temperature on Gender  Determine the gender of birds and geckos as they hatch in an incubation chamber. Control the temperature of the chamber, and record data to determine if the temperature has an affect on the gender of either species.
  3. Seed Germination  Perform experiments with several seed types to see what conditions yield the highest germination (sprouting) rate. Three different types of seeds can be studied, and the temperature, water and light in the germination chamber can be controlled. No two trials will have the same result, so repeated trials and data analysis can be used.
  4. Food Chain  In this ecosystem consisting of hawks, snakes, rabbits and grass, the population of each species can be studied as part of a food chain. Disease can be introduced for any species, and the number of animals can be increased or decreased at any time, just like in the real world.
4. Investigate how overpopulation impacts an ecosystem.
  1. Rabbit Population by Season   Observe the population of rabbits in an environment over many years. The land available to the rabbits can be adjusted, as well as the weather conditions, in order to compare the effects of urban sprawl and unusual weather on wildlife populations
  2. Estimating Population Size  Adjust the number of fish in a lake to be tagged and the number of fish to be recaptured. Use the number of tagged fish in the catch to estimate the number of fish in the lake.
  3. Ecosystems, Biomes, and Habitats Neighborhoods  -  Outstanding website illustration of ecosystems
5. Explain that some environmental changes occur slowly while others occur rapidly (e.g., forest and pond succession, fires and decomposition).

 

  1. Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium  Set the initial percentages of three types of parrots in a population and track changes in genotype and allele frequency through several generations. Analyze population data to develop an understanding of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Determine how initial allele percentages will affect the equilibrium state of the population
  2. Effect of Temperature on Gender  Determine the gender of birds and geckos as they hatch in an incubation chamber. Control the temperature of the chamber, and record data to determine if the temperature has an affect on the gender of either species.
6. Summarize the ways that natural occurrences and human activity affect the transfer of energy in Earth’s ecosystems (e.g., fire, hurricanes, roads, oil spills).
  1. Climate Change Impacts on Forest Ecosystems  This website covers the transfer of energy in Earth's ecosystem.
7. Explain that photosynthetic cells convert solar energy into chemical energy that is used to carry on life functions or is transferred to consumers and used to carry on their life functions.
  1. Photosynthesis Lab  Study photosynthesis in a variety of conditions. Oxygen production is used to measure the rate of photosynthesis. Light intensity, carbon dioxide levels, temperature, and wavelength of light can all be varied. Determine which conditions are ideal for photosynthesis, and understand how limiting factors affect oxygen production.
8. Investigate the great diversity among organisms.
  1. Pond Life Videos
    This web site has a fantastic collection of free videos of microscopic pond life. Freshwater ponds provide a home for a wide variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic plants, insects, and animals. The vast majority of pond inhabitants, however, are invisible until viewed under the microscope. Beneath the placid surface of any pond is a microscopic metropolis bustling with activity as tiny bizarre organisms pursue their lives; locomotion, eating, trying not to be eaten, excreting, and reproducing. In this collection of digital movies, observe the activities of microscopic organisms taken from a typical North Florida pond.

     

Physical Sciences

1. Investigate how matter can change forms but the total amount of matter remains constant.
  1. Changing Matter
    This web page demonstrates what happens to ice as heat is gradually increased. The animations and explanations help the student to understand the physical change from solid to liquid to gas.
  2. Phase Changes  Explore the relationship between molecular motion, temperature, and phase changes. Compare the molecular structure of solids, liquids, and gases. Graph temperature changes as ice is melted and water is boiled. Find the effect of altitude on phase changes. The starting temperature, ice volume, altitude, and rate of heating or cooling can be adjusted.
2. Describe how an object can have potential energy due to its position or chemical composition and can have kinetic energy due to its motion.
  1. How to make a Roller Coaster Work
    This interactive web site demonstrates the concepts of potential and kinetic energy by using a roller coaster. The site allows you to choose one of three roller coaster tracks and a starting height for your car. Then it generates an animation showing what happens to the car and how far it makes it on the track.
  2. Roller Coaster Physics  Adjust the hills on a toy‑car roller coaster and watch what happens as the car careens toward an egg (that can be broken) at the end of the track. The height of three hills can be manipulated, along with the mass of the car and the friction of the track. A graph of various variables of motion can be viewed as the car travels, including potential, kinetic, and total energies, and the x and y components of position, velocity, and acceleration
  3. Inclined Plane - Sliding Investigate the energy and motion of a brick sliding down an inclined plane. The ramp angle can be varied, a variety of materials for the brick and ramp can be used, and friction can be turned on and off. Potential and kinetic energy are reported as the brick slides down the ramp. Two experiments can be run simultaneously to compare results as factors are varied
3. Identify different forms of energy (e.g., electrical, mechanical, chemical, thermal, nuclear, radiant and acoustic).
  1. Forms of Energy   You will find a smart board lesson that will allow your students to better understand the different forms of energy.  Created by Victora Dodich
4. Explain how energy can change forms but the total amount of energy remains constant.
  1. Boyle's Law and Charles' Law  Investigate the properties of an ideal gas by performing experiments in which the temperature is held constant (Boyle's Law), and others in which the pressure remains fixed (Charles' Law). The pressure is controlled through the placement of masses on the lid of the container, and temperature is controlled with an adjustable heat source.
5. Trace energy transformation in a simple closed system (e.g., a flashlight).  

Science and Technology

1. Explain how needs, attitudes and values influence the direction of technological development in various cultures.  
2. Describe how decisions to develop and use technologies often put environmental and economic concerns in direct competition with each other.  
3. Recognize that science can only answer some questions and technology can only solve some human problems.  
4. Design and build a product or create a solution to a problem given two constraints (e.g., limits of cost and time for design and production, supply of materials and environmental effects).  

Scientific Inquiry

1. Explain that variables and controls can affect the results of an investigation and that ideally one variable should be tested at a time; however it is not always possible to control all variables.  
2. Identify simple independent and dependent variables.  
3. Formulate and identify questions to guide scientific investigations that connect to science concepts and can be answered through scientific investigations.  
4. Choose the appropriate tools and instruments and use relevant safety procedures to complete scientific investigations.
  1. Fire Extinguisher Training
    Module from Oklahoma State University offering a guided tutorial and quiz over the proper use of fire extinguishers. Ideal for safety training for the Science or Vocational lab.
     
5. Analyze alternative scientific explanations and predictions and recognize that there may be more than one good way to interpret a given set of data.  
6. Identify faulty reasoning and statements that go beyond the evidence or misinterpret the evidence.  
7. Use graphs, tables and charts to study physical phenomena and infer mathematical relationships between variables (e.g., speed, density).
  1. Forces Tutorial - Part 1
    This is an excellent and extensive online tutorial about force, using animations, audio explanations, and interactive quizzes. This tutorial covers speed, velocity, acceleration, force, mass, weight, friction, and more. Lots of practical examples and graphs are used to explain these concepts. You can view the entire tutorial or jump to the section you want.

Scientific Ways of Knowing

1. Show that the reproducibility of results is essential to reduce bias in scientific investigations.  
2. Describe how repetition of an experiment may reduce bias.  
3. Describe how the work of science requires a variety of human abilities and qualities that are helpful in daily life (e.g., reasoning, creativity, skepticism, openness).