5th Grade Science 

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Last updated Feb 2011

Life Sciences Physical Sciences Science and Technology Scientific Inquiry Scientific Ways
of Knowing

Earth and Space Sciences

(Based on State of Ohio
Curriculum Standards)

1. Describe how night and day are caused by Earth's rotation.
  1. Hours and Earth rotation   This is a very fine sight to allow the student to not only visually see the earth and sun as it rotates but also allows the student to visually see the day and night difference between cities.  4 Star
  2. Live videos of Earth.    This Link will present to you a live view of the Earth.  You may click on different areas of Earth to view it from various sites.  This is an outstanding website to teach night and day. You will be pleasantly surprised at how informative and accurate this site is.  You also may change the pixels to 550 to get a better view. 4 Star
  3. Maps and live videos of Earth.    This webpage will be updated as required to allow your students to view the world as we know it today.  You will be pleasantly surprised at how informative and accurate this web page is.
  4. Earth lites  This image of Earth’s city lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth’s surface.   Click on image to zoom in
  5. Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun  Observe the motions of the Earth, Moon and Sun in three dimensions to explain Sunrise and Sunset, and to see how we define a day, a month, and a year. Compare times of Sunrise and Sunset for different dates and locations. Relate shadows to the position of the Sun in the sky, and relate shadows to compass directions.
  6. SOLAR ECLIPSES: WHY ECLIPSES HAPPEN
    Solar eclipses happen when the Moon blocks the light from the Sun During a total solar eclipse, the sky appears as dark as night, and you can see the Sun's glowing corona
    4 Star   This website was introduced by Mr. Van Arnhem Longfellow Elem.
  7. Observing the Sky: Motion of the Earth - Rotation  This is another good site allowing students to learn about Earth and rotation around the sun.

     

Gizmos are fun, easy to use, and flexible enough to support many different teaching styles and contexts. 

You will present to your students a visual animated manipulative allowing for an easier and faster teaching pedagogy.

You will discover this tool strategically located throughout the website

2. Explain that Earth is one of several planets to orbit the sun, and that the moon orbits Earth.
  1. Phases of the Moon.  Shows animation
  2. Sudoku  discover the planets and dwarf using the Sudoku concept.  Fun for your class. 4 Star
  3. Views of the Solar System   Views of the Solar System presents a vivid multimedia adventure unfolding the splendor of the Sun, planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and more. Discover the latest scientific information, or study the history of space exploration, rocketry, early astronauts, space missions, spacecraft through a vast archive of photographs, scientific facts, text, graphics and videos.
  4. The Nine Planets - For Kids This site has lots of info on the nine planets of our solar system. The graphics are cute and the information very understandable. When you get to the page listed here you need to click on the picture of the solar system to enter the main site.
  5. Google Mars.  Look at Mars up close zoom in on the Red Planet.   4 Star
  6. Star Child: The Solar System  NASA hosts this student friendly site which contains a great deal of information on the Solar System written in easily understood terms. Be sure to check out the Solar System online activities!  3 Star
  7. Earth, Sun, and Moon   At this interactive web site you can control the orbit of the moon and the earth to learn how they move and how long it takes to complete revolutions. When done you can take a quiz on what you learned.  4 Star
  8. Learn about the Planets - from Kids Astronomy
  9. Order it up - Measures of size and scale help us understand the magnitude of objects. Play with scales while trying to arrange planets by magnitude of mass, size, temperature, density, distance, gravity or magnetic field. Correctly order the planets and you unscramble a mystery picture! To play, click on the blue link; Play Order it Up: Solar System Edition
  10. Examine the vast distances between planets in the solar system - This animation simulates a voyage from the sun past all nine planets. In this animation, the apparent speed of the viewer is over 300 times the speed of light.
  11. See Earth from Eight Different Perspectives - a fantastic series of animations showing our dynamic atmosphere, seasonal variation in vegetation, and six others.
  12. Moon Jeopardy   Power Point game to review questions about the moon.  Make sure you download first so that it runs faster.
  13. Smart Board Lesson  Created by Amy Roberts-Wilson  SB
  14. Video Phases of the Moon
  15. Video The Earth
3. Describe the characteristics of Earth and its orbit about the sun (e.g., three-fourths of Earth's surface is covered by a layer of water [some of it frozen], the entire planet surrounded by a thin blanket of air, elliptical orbit, tilted axis and spherical planet).
  1. StarChild: Earth, the Water Planet NASA's "StarChild" is a wonderful resource for every classroom. This section pertains to the Earth, it's rotation, and more. A glossary of terms is provided in hyper-text format to increase reading comprehension.
  2. Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun  Observe the motions of the Earth, Moon and Sun in three dimensions to explain Sunrise and Sunset, and to see how we define a day, a month, and a year. Compare times of Sunrise and Sunset for different dates and locations. Relate shadows to the position of the Sun in the sky, and relate shadows to compass directions.  4 Star
4. Explain that stars are like the sun, some being smaller and some larger, but so far away that they look like points of light.
  1. StarChild: The Universe  The section of NASA's StarChild site discusses Galaxies, Stars, Black Holes, Dark Matter, The Milky Way, Quasars and Cosmology. Printable versions of all pages are available.
  2. Solar System Exploration   This site was created by NASA and will cover quite a few state standards.  This is one of the sites you spend quite a bit of time with because it illustrates so much. 3 Star
  3. Star Spectra  Analyze the spectra of a variety of stars. Determine the elements that are represented in each spectrum, and use this information to infer the temperature and classification of the star. Look for unusual features such as red-shifted stars, nebulas, and stars with large planets. 4 Star
  4. Chapter 16 -  Constellations  Smart Board Lesson

 

5. Explain how the supply of many non-renewable resources is limited and can be extended through reducing, reusing and recycling but cannot be extended indefinitely.
  1. Nonrenewable energy from Energy  Great info and links all about nonrenewable energy.
  2. Earth Day at Kids Domain  This site has lots of information on conservation, recycling, and responsibility. There are online games, a history of Earth Day, stories, coloring pages, poems, clip art, crafts, and more.
  3. A to Z Teacher Stuff Recycling Page  This site has links to lessons, activities, and websites that deal with recycling and composting.
  4. Clean Up Your World game at Funschool  In this online game the student has to collect items in a park setting and sort them into paper, plastic, glass, and cans for recycling.  fun
  5. Free the Beach game at Funschool  In this online game the student has to collect items in a beach setting and sort them into paper, plastic, glass, and cans for recycling.

6. Investigate ways Earth's renewable resources (e.g., fresh water, air, wildlife and trees) can be maintained.

  1. Renewable energy from Energy  Great info and links all about renewable energy.
  2. Dr. E's Energy Lab  This web site has links to tons of info on renewable energy, such as solar, wind, and geothermal energy, and alternative fuels.

Life Sciences

1. Describe the role of producers in the transfer of energy entering ecosystems as sunlight to chemical energy through photosynthesis.
  1. Photosynthesis animation
  2. Photosynthesis - a large document with lots of good illustrations
  3. Photosynthesis and Respiration - flashcards to review concepts of photosynthesis and respiration
  4. Photosynthesis Study Guide - No answers, but good review questions to test your knowledge.
  5. Transpiration - transfer of water from plants to the atmosphere
  6. Photosynthesis Lab  Study photosynthesis in a variety of conditions. Oxygen production is used to measure the rate of photosynthesis. Light intensity, carbon dioxide levels, temperature, and wavelength of light can all be varied. Determine which conditions are ideal for photosynthesis, and understand how limiting factors affect oxygen production.  4 Star

2. Explain how almost all kinds of animals' food can be traced back to plants.
  1. Food chain from Ham's Hall Pond
  2. KidWings website  This site was designed to teach young and old about the wonders of birds. The most exciting part of the site is the Virtual Owl Pellet Dissection. Many interactive activities await you.
3. Trace the organization of simple food chains and food webs (e.g., producers, herbivores, carnivores, omnivores and decomposers).
  1. Ham's Hall Pond    This is a fine site to explain and illustrate my ideas in Life cycles not just the Indicator to the left. This is a great interactive site also, where students can learn about life cycles, food chains, and more in a virtual pond.
  2.  Food Chain Game   You will find this located on a website with many other activities look under popular games look under Popular games
4. Summarize that organisms can survive only in ecosystems in which their needs can be met (e.g., food, water, shelter, air, carrying capacity and waste disposal). The world has different ecosystems and distinct ecosystems support the lives of different types of organisms.
  1. Ecosystems, Biomes, and Habitats  The Franklin Institute Science Museum has created units of study that are designed to stimulate critical thinking about Ecosystems, Biomes, and Habitats. Visit this site for ideas that introduce hands-on science with inquiry-based facilitation into your classroom
  2. Biomes of the World  This site has loads of information and pictures on six biomes and six ecosystems of the world. This is a very in depth but useful site!
  3. Helping plants grow well  This interactive site has you try to grow a plant to its full height by controlling water, heat, and light. When you are done you can take a quiz on what you learned.  4 Star
  4. Water Science for Schools   This site is worth it's weight in gold showing many different ideas of water and how it affects us.  4 Star
5. Support how an organism's patterns of behavior are related to the nature of that organism's ecosystem, including the kinds and numbers of other organisms present, the availability of food and resources, and the changing physical characteristics of the ecosystem.
  1. Power Point for undercover Power Point Example to download.  Power point example is on endangered species.
  2. How to create an Undercover Power Point presentation
  3. Rubric For Uncover Power Point
  4. Website reference  endangered species
  5. Website reference endangered species
  6. Website reference endangered species
  7. Website reference endangered species -- covers all species
  8. Website reference endangered species

6. Analyze how all organisms, including humans, cause changes in their ecosystems and how these changes can be beneficial, neutral or detrimental (e.g., beaver ponds, earthworm burrows, grasshoppers eating plants, people planting and cutting trees and people introducing a new species).
  1. Biomes of the World  This site has loads of information and pictures on six biomes and six ecosystems of the world. This is a very in depth but useful site!

Physical Sciences

1. Define temperature as the measure of thermal energy and describe the way it is measured.
  1. The Energy Story - Geothermal Energy  This Chapter from the California Energy Commission's "Energy Quest" begins with: "Geothermal Energy has been around for as long as the Earth has existed. "Geo" means earth, and "thermal" means heat. So, geothermal means earth-heat." Excellent age specific material on thermal energy provided along with animations to help the student visualize the processes described.
2. Trace how thermal energy can transfer from one object to another by conduction.
  1. Keeping Warm - investigate how well various materials insulate

3. Describe that electrical current in a circuit can produce thermal energy, light, sound and/or magnetic forces.
  1. Intro to Electricity and Magnetism  This interactive activity from ExploreScience covers topics such as static electricity, current, resistance, conductors, circuits, magnetism, the relationship between electricity and magnetism, and how generators work.
    Note: Every Gizmo in the library can be used for up to 5 minutes each per day.
  2. The Electricity Book: Part 2 This interactive lesson teaches all about how electricity moves through a circuit to light a bulb. Great animations and explanations make the information clear.
  3. Energy Quest   A wonderful site from the California Energy Commission includes science projects, puzzles and games, a gallery of pictures and biographies of energy pioneers, "Watt's That?" the Internet Energy Game Show, tips on how to be safe around electricity, descriptions of the various types of energy, links, and much, much more!
  4. Magnetism and Electric Current  This online learning object uses clear explanations, diagrams, animation, and narration to teach that wires carrying an electric current produce a magnetic field and that a current in a coil produces a magnetic field pattern similar to a bar magnet. There is also a short quiz at the end to review the material.
    (Requires Flash)
  5. The Science of Electricity from Engineering Interact  This interactive, educational site from the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge teaches about electricity including batteries, circuits, and electricity in everyday life. Students learn about these concepts while playing through "Silicon Spies" which is a fun, educational game. To win the game the students get quizzed on what they have learned. Finally there is an extension section where students learn about real-world applications of the concepts taught. (Requires Flash)
  6. Circuits and Conductors - an interactive site from the BBC
  7. Electricity and Magnetism - the basics of circuits
  8. Investigate a complete circuit at BBC
  9. Measuring voltage - the most common activity in electronics. Use the links at the bottom of the page to move to other activities related to measuring voltage.
  10. Measuring Current - Circuits require the correct amount of voltage and current in order to work. Use the links at the bottom of the page to move to other activities related to measuring voltage.
  11. Magnetic Field of a Bar Magnet - The magnetic field of a bar magnet can be investigated with this compass needle applet.
4. Trace how electrical current travels by creating a simple electric circuit that will light a bulb.
  1. Intro to Electricity and Magnetism This interactive activity from Explore Science covers topics such as static electricity, current, resistance, conductors, circuits, magnetism, the relationship between electricity and magnetism, and how generators work.
    Note: Every Gizmo in the library can be used for up to 5 minutes each per day.
  2. The Electricity Book: Part 2  This interactive lesson teaches all about how electricity moves through a circuit to light a bulb. Great animations and explanations make the information clear.
  3. Energy Quest  A wonderful site from the California Energy Commission includes science projects, puzzles and games, a gallery of pictures and biographies of energy pioneers, "Watt's That?" the Internet Energy Game Show, tips on how to be safe around electricity, descriptions of the various types of energy, links, and much, much more!
  4. Watered-down Electricity
    This is a cute and informative animated site that explains to kids how electricity works by comparing it to flowing water. It covers batteries, circuits, and making a light bulb glow.
  5. ReviseWise Science - Electricity  This site from the BBC offers an interactive lesson on joining electrical motors, buzzers, bells, etc. with conductors to make a complete circuit. The site also includes a Fact Sheet, Quiz and Worksheet.
  6. Guide to Electrical Circuits  This website will provide you with some interesting ideas on electrical circuits.
  7. Annie's Circuit builder.  Try out Annie's Circuit Builder. Help Annie build and test electric circuits. Try not to make a short circuit or burn out the light bulb!
  8. Circuits   Welcome to the exciting world of electricity and circuits. On this website you will discover what goes on inside the electrical items that you see everyday.
  9. When you connect a light bulb  What is going on in the circuit that we can't see? This activity will help you develop a model of what's happening in electrical circuits.
  10. Circuits   Use the wires to join them together so that the light comes on. When you have done this you have made an electrical circuit –
  11. Electricity Quiz 
  12. Electrical Circuit Experiments

     
5. Explore and summarize observations of the transmission, bending (refraction) and reflection of light.
  1. Refraction of Light This web site gives a detailed explanation of light refraction. It also has several interactive tools, including one where the user can pick a medium and then adjust the angle of the light hitting it to see the effect it has on refraction.
  2. Reflection of Light  This web site gives a detailed explanation of light reflection. It also has several interactive tools, including one where the user can pick the angle and color of the light hitting a surface to see the effect on reflection.
  3. Refraction Video is provided to illustrate  Light Observing Refraction of Light.  Thanks goes to Mrs. Alvord for this link.
  4. Reflection Light and the Law of Reflection Video is provided to illustrate this concept.  Thanks goes to Mrs. Alvord for this link.
6. Describe and summarize observations of the transmission, reflection, and absorption of sound.
7. Describe that changing the rate of vibration can vary the pitch of a sound.

Science and Technology

1. Investigate positive and negative impacts of human activity and technology on the environment.
  1. Search for your school.   Use this site to answer these three questions and also assist you in answering the questions on scientific Inquiry.  You will need to create a graph from the statistics that will be presented to you.   Some of your answers  may be open ended and your teacher will explain this concept to you.   Teachers this website will allow you the opportunity to assist you in teaching the following state standards.
2. Revise an existing design used to solve a problem based on peer review.  
3. Explain how the solution to one problem may create other problems.

Scientific Inquiry

1. Select and safely use the appropriate tools to collect data when conducting investigations and communicating findings to others (e.g., thermometers, timers, balances, spring scales, magnifiers, microscopes and other appropriate tools).  
2. Evaluate observations and measurements made by other people and identify reasons for any discrepancies.

3. Use evidence and observations to explain and communicate the results of investigations.

4. Identify one or two variables in a simple experiment.

5. Identify potential hazards and/or precautions involved in an investigation.

6. Explain why results of an experiment are sometimes different (e.g., because of unexpected differences in what is being investigated, unrealized differences in the methods used or in the circumstances in which the investigation was carried out, and because of errors in observations).

Scientific Ways of Knowing

1. Summarize how conclusions and ideas change as new knowledge is gained.

2. Develop descriptions, explanations and models using evidence to defend/support findings.
3. Explain why an experiment must be repeated by different people or at different times or places and yield consistent results before the results are accepted.
4. Identify how scientists use different kinds of ongoing investigations depending on the questions they are trying to answer (e.g., observations of things or events in nature, data collection and controlled experiments).
5. Keep records of investigations and observations that are understandable weeks or months later.