10th Grade Science

 

Earth and Space Sciences Life Sciences Physical Sciences
Science and Technology
Scientific Inquiry Scientific Ways of Knowing

 

Earth and Space Sciences

(Based on State of Ohio
Curriculum Standards)

 
1. Summarize the relationship between the climatic zone and the resultant biomes. (This includes explaining the nature of the rainfall and temperature of the mid-latitude climatic zone that supports the deciduous forest.)
  1. Biomes of the World
    This site has loads of information and pictures on six biomes and six ecosystems of the world. This is a very in depth but useful site!
2. Explain climate and weather patterns associated with certain geographic locations and features (e.g., tornado alley, tropical hurricanes and lake effect snow).
  1. Educator's Bridge to Science  This web page will illustrate many connections for teachers and students.
  2. National Center for Atmospheric Research   This website will present an almost all inclusive study of the weather.
  3. Earth Live   View on line real time from a satellite the planet and determine for your self local and regional weather live. 4 star
  4. Details: Seasons: Why do we have them? - Learn why the temperature in the summertime is higher than it is in the winter by studying the amount of light striking the Earth. Experiment with a plate detector to measure the amount of light striking the plate as the angle of the plate is adjusted (and then use a group of plates placed at different locations on the Earth) and measure the incoming radiation on each plate.
  5. Details: Seasons in 3DGain an understanding of the causes of seasons by observing the Earth as it orbits the Sun in three dimensions. Create graphs of solar intensity and day length, and use collected data to describe and explain seasonal changes.
  6. Details: Seasons Around the World - Use a three dimensional view of the Earth, Moon and Sun to explore seasonal changes at a variety of locations. Strengthen your knowledge of global climate patterns by comparing solar energy input at the Poles to the Equator. Manipulate Earth’s axis to increase or diminish seasonal changes.
  7. Coastal Winds and Clouds -Learn about atmospheric conditions near a coast using basic observables: wind and temperature. Measure daily temperatures over both land and water near a coastline, along with the wind speed and direction. The conditions can be recorded at a variety of altitudes.
  8. Coastal Winds and Clouds-Learn about atmospheric conditions near a coast using basic observables: wind and temperature. Measure daily temperatures over both land and water near a coastline, along with the wind speed and direction. The conditions can be recorded at a variety of altitudes.
  9. Hurricane Motion-Use data from up to three weather stations to predict the motion of a hurricane. The wind speed and direction along with cloud cover is provided for each station using standard weather symbols.
  10. Seasons Around the World-Use a three dimensional view of the Earth, Moon and Sun to explore seasonal changes at a variety of locations. Strengthen your knowledge of global climate patterns by comparing solar energy input at the Poles to the Equator. Manipulate Earth’s axis to increase or diminish seasonal changes.
  11. Seasons in 3D-Gain an understanding of the causes of seasons by observing the Earth as it orbits the Sun in three dimensions. Create graphs of solar intensity and day length, and use collected data to describe and explain seasonal changes.
  12. Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun-Observe the motions of the Earth, Moon and Sun in three dimensions to explain Sunrise and Sunset, and to see how we define a day, a month, and a year. Compare times of Sunrise and Sunset for different dates and locations. Relate shadows to the position of the Sun in the sky, and relate shadows to compass directions.
  13. Seasons: Why do we have them?-Learn why the temperature in the summertime is higher than it is in the winter by studying the amount of light striking the Earth. Experiment with a plate detector to measure the amount of light striking the plate as the angle of the plate is adjusted (and then use a group of plates placed at different locations on the Earth) and measure the incoming radiation on each plate.
3. Explain how geologic time can be estimated by multiple methods (e.g., rock sequences, fossil correlation, radiometric dating).
  1. Details: Plate Tectonics Move the Earth at various locations to observe the effects of the motion of the techtonic plates, including volcanic eruptions. Information about each of the major types of plate collisions is shown, along with the typical location on the Earth.
  2. Details: Rock Classification- Try to classify a dozen different rock samples using just the appearance. Common characteristics of each major rock classification is provided to help in the classification. One can also attempt to classify the rocks by the location where they are commonly found in nature.
  3. Details: Rock Cycle - Play the role of a piece of rock moving through the rock cycle. Select a starting location and follow many possible paths throughout the cycle. Facts about each location will be presented, along with images of particular types of rocks.
  4. Half-life-Investigate the decay of a radioactive substance. The half-life and the number of radioactive atoms can be adjusted, and theoretical or random decay can be observed. Data can be interpreted visually using a dynamic graph, a bar chart, and a table. Determine the half-lives of two sample isotopes as well as samples with randomly generated half-lives.
     
4. Describe how organisms on Earth contributed to the dramatic change in oxygen content of Earth’s early atmosphere.  
5. Explain how the acquisition and use of resources, urban growth and waste disposal can accelerate natural change and impact the quality of life.  
6. Describe ways that human activity can alter biogeochemical cycles (e.g., carbon and nitrogen cycles) as well as food webs and energy pyramids (e.g., pest control, legume rotation crops vs. chemical fertilizers).
  1. Details: Greenhouse Effect  Within this simulated region of land, daytime's rising temperature and the falling temperature at night can be measured, along with heat flow in and out of the system. The amount of greenhouse gases present in the atmosphere can be adjusted over time, and the long term effects can be investigated.
  2. Food Chain-In this ecosystem consisting of hawks, snakes, rabbits and grass, the population of each species can be studied as part of a food chain. Disease can be introduced for any species, and the number of animals can be increased or decreased at any time, just like in the real world.
  3. Water Pollution-Get to know the four main types of pollution present in the environment, and then look at a variety of real?world examples as you try to guess what type of pollution is represented by each situation. All of the real?world situations can be viewed every day in different parts of the world.
     
7. Describe advances and issues in Earth and space science that have important long-lasting effects on science and society (e.g., geologic time scales, global warming, depletion of resources, exponential population growth).  

Life Sciences

1. Explain that living cells
a. are composed of a small number of key chemical elements (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur)
b. are the basic unit of structure and function of all living things
c. come from pre-existing cells, and
d. are different from viruses.
  1. Details: Cell Structure   Select sample cells from a plant or animal and place the cells on a microscope to look inside the cells. Information about their common structures is provided (and the structures are highlighted), but you will need to move your microscope slide to find all the different structure.
  2. Cell Structure-Select sample cells from a plant or animal and place the cells on a microscope to look inside the cells. Information about their common structures is provided (and the structures are highlighted), but you will need to move your microscope slide to find all the different structures.
  3. Paramecium Homeostasis-Observe how a paramecium maintains stable internal conditions in a changing aquatic environment. Water moves into the organism by osmosis, and is pumped out by the contractile vacuole. The concentration of solutes in the water will determine the rate of contractions in the paramecium.
2. Compare the structure, function and interrelatedness of cell organelles in eukaryotic cells (e.g., nucleus, chromosome, mitochondria, cell membrane, cell wall, chloroplast, cilia, flagella) and prokaryotic cells.
  1. Plant, Animal and Bacteria Cell Models
    This web site has great diagrams and explanations of plant, animal, and bacterial cells, including all the organelles.
  2. Cell Energy Cycle-
    Explore the processes of photosynthesis and respiration that occur within plant cells. The cyclical nature of the two processes can be constructed visually, and the photosynthesis and respiration equations can be balanced in a descriptive and numerical format.
  3. Cell Structure-Select sample cells from a plant or animal and place the cells on a microscope to look inside the cells. Information about their common structures is provided (and the structures are highlighted), but you will need to move your microscope slide to find all the different structures.
  4. Paramecium Homeostasis-Observe how a paramecium maintains stable internal conditions in a changing aquatic environment. Water moves into the organism by osmosis, and is pumped out by the contractile vacuole. The concentration of solutes in the water will determine the rate of contractions in the paramecium.
  5. Photosynthesis Lab-Study photosynthesis in a variety of conditions. Oxygen production is used to measure the rate of photosynthesis. Light intensity, carbon dioxide levels, temperature, and wavelength of light can all be varied. Determine which conditions are ideal for photosynthesis, and understand how limiting factors affect oxygen production.
  6. RNA and Protein Synthesis-Go through the process of synthesizing proteins through RNA transcription and translation. Learn about the many steps involved in protein synthesis including: unzipping of DNA, formation of mRNA, attaching of mRNA to the ribosome, and linking of amino acids to form a protein.
     
3. Explain the characteristics of life as indicated by cellular processes including
a. homeostasis
b. energy transfers and transformation
c. transportation of molecules
d. disposal of wastes
e. synthesis of new molecules
  1. Cells Alive This website is awesome.  You really need to click on this website just to view what it has to offer.  (Go to HOW big is a ..?) first.
  2. Human Homeostasis-Adjust the levels of clothing, perspiration, and exercise to maintain a stable internal temperature as the external temperature changes. Water and blood sugar levels need to be replenished regularly, and fatigue occurs with heavy exercise. Severe hypothermia, heat stroke, or dehydration can result if internal stability is not maintained.
  3. Paramecium Homeostasis-Observe how a paramecium maintains stable internal conditions in a changing aquatic environment. Water moves into the organism by osmosis, and is pumped out by the contractile vacuole. The concentration of solutes in the water will determine the rate of contractions in the paramecium.
  4. Osmosis-Adjust the concentration of a solute on either side of a membrane in a cell and observe the system as it adjusts to the conditions through osmosis. The initial concentration of the solute can be manipulated, along with the volume of the cell.
  5. Cell Energy Cycle-Explore the processes of photosynthesis and respiration that occur within plant cells. The cyclical nature of the two processes can be constructed visually, and the photosynthesis and respiration equations can be balanced in a descriptive and numerical format.
  6. Interdependence of Plants and Animals-
    Discover how animals, plants, and sunlight interact to maintain a balance of gases in Earth?s atmosphere. Place aquatic plants and pond snails into sealed test tubes and incubate in a light or dark room. Measure concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide using the indicator brom thymol blue, and use this information to infer oxygen levels as well.
  7. RNA and Protein Synthesis-Go through the process of synthesizing proteins through RNA transcription and translation. Learn about the many steps involved in protein synthesis including: unzipping of DNA, formation of mRNA, attaching of mRNA to the ribosome, and linking of amino acids to form a protein.
     
4. Summarize the general processes of cell division and differentiation, and explain why specialized cells are useful to organisms and explain that complex multicellular organisms are formed as highly organized arrangements of differentiated cells.
  1. Animal Cell Mitosis -This web site offers great explanations and animations of cell division.
  2. Details: Cell Division Begin with a single cell and watch as mitosis and cell division occurs. The cells will go through the steps of interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis. The length of the cell cycle can be controlled, and data related to the number of cells present and their current phase can be recorded.
  3. Cell Division-Begin with a single cell and watch as mitosis and cell division occurs. The cells will go through the steps of interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis. The length of the cell cycle can be controlled, and data related to the number of cells present and their current phase can be recorded.
     

 

5. Illustrate the relationship of the structure and function of DNA to protein synthesis and the characteristics of an organism.
  1. Tour of the Basics: Heredity
    This interactive web site explains many topics in genetics with clear explanations and animated slide shows. The topics include DNA, Genes, Chromosomes, Proteins, Heredity, and Traits. You can also download the entire presentation for use offline.
  2. Transcribe and Translate a Gene 
    This interactive web site explains the process of transcribing a DNA sequence and translating it into a protein by letting you do it yourself. You get to build the mRNA sequence and then assemble the needed amino acids to make the final protein.
6. Explain that a unit of hereditary information is called a gene, and genes may occur in different forms called alleles (e.g., gene for pea plant height has two alleles, tall and short).
  1. Tour of the Basics: Heredity
    This interactive web site explains many topics in genetics with clear explanations and animated slide shows. The topics include DNA, Genes, Chromosomes, Proteins, Heredity, and Traits. You can also download the entire presentation for use offline.
  2. Details: Mouse Genetics (One Trait)  Breed "pure" mice with known genotypes that exhibit specific fur colors, and learn how traits are passed on via dominant and recessive genes. Mice can be stored in cages for future breeding, and the statistics of fur color are reported every time a pair of mice breed. Punnet squares can be used to predict results.
  3. Chicken Genetics-Breed "pure" chickens with known genotypes that exhibit specific feather colors, and learn how traits are passed on via codominant genes. Chickens can be stored in cages for future breeding, and the statistics of feather color are reported every time the chickens breed. Punnet squares can be used to predict results.
  4. Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)-Breed "pure" mice with known genotypes that exhibit specific fur and eye colors, and learn how traits are passed on via dominant and recessive genes. Mice can be stored in cages for future breeding, and the statistics of fur and eye color are reported every time a pair of mice breed. Punnet squares can be used to predict results.
  5. Mouse Genetics (One Trait)-
    Breed "pure" mice with known genotypes that exhibit specific fur colors, and learn how traits are passed on via dominant and recessive genes. Mice can be stored in cages for future breeding, and the statistics of fur color are reported every time a pair of mice breed. Punnet squares can be used to predict results.

     

  6. Human Karyotyping-
    Sort and pair the images of human chromosomes obtained in a scan. Find differences in the scans of the various patients to find out specific things that can cause disease, as well as the gender of the person.  

 

7. Describe that spontaneous changes in DNA are mutations, which are a source of genetic variation. When mutations occur in sex cells, they may be passed on to future generations; mutations that occur in body cells may affect the functioning of that cell or the organism in which that cell is found.
  1. Tour of the Basics: Heredity
    This interactive web site explains many topics in genetics with clear explanations and animated slide shows. The topics include DNA, Genes, Chromosomes, Proteins, Heredity, and Traits. You can also download the entire presentation for use offline.
  2. Details: Building DNA  Construct a DNA molecule, examine its double helix structure, and then go through the DNA replication process. Learn how each component fits into a DNA molecule, and see how a unique, self-replicating code can be created.
  3. Details: RNA and Protein Synthesis  Go through the process of synthesizing proteins through RNA transcription and translation. Learn about the many steps involved in protein synthesis including: unzipping of DNA, formation of mRNA, attaching of mRNA to the ribosome, and linking of amino acids to form a protein.
  4. Details: DNA Fingerprint Analysis  Perform DNA scans on frogs to learn how differences and similarities in the scans can be used to identify physical characteristics of the frogs. This technique of scanning is what provides the "DNA fingerprint," which is becoming more commonplace in today's society. The DNA of twin frogs can also be studied to see how the scans compare.
  5. Evolution: Mutation and Selection-
    Observe evolution in a fictional population of bugs. Set the background to any color, and see natural selection taking place. Inheritance of color occurs according to Mendel's laws and probability. Mutations occur at random, and probability of capture by predators is determined by the insect's camouflage.
8. Use the concepts of Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics (e.g., segregation, independent assortment, dominant and recessive traits, sex  inked traits, jumping genes) to explain inheritance.
  1. Tour of the Basics: Heredity
    This interactive web site explains many topics in genetics with clear explanations and animated slide shows. The topics include DNA, Genes, Chromosomes, Proteins, Heredity, and Traits. You can also download the entire presentation for use offline.
  2. Chicken Genetics-Breed "pure" chickens with known genotypes that exhibit specific feather colors, and learn how traits are passed on via codominant genes. Chickens can be stored in cages for future breeding, and the statistics of feather color are reported every time the chickens breed. Punnet squares can be used to predict results.
  3. Mouse Genetics (One Trait)-Breed "pure" mice with known genotypes that exhibit specific fur colors, and learn how traits are passed on via dominant and recessive genes. Mice can be stored in cages for future breeding, and the statistics of fur color are reported every time a pair of mice breed. Punnet squares can be used to predict results.
  4. Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)-Breed "pure" mice with known genotypes that exhibit specific fur and eye colors, and learn how traits are passed on via dominant and recessive genes. Mice can be stored in cages for future breeding, and the statistics of fur and eye color are reported every time a pair of mice breed. Punnet squares can be used to predict results.
9. Describe how matter cycles and energy flows through different levels of organization in living systems and between living systems and the physical environment. Explain how some energy is stored and much is dissipated into the environment as thermal energy (e.g., food webs and energy pyramids).
  1. Photosynthesis Lab-
    Study photosynthesis in a variety of conditions. Oxygen production is used to measure the rate of photosynthesis. Light intensity, carbon dioxide levels, temperature, and wavelength of light can all be varied. Determine which conditions are ideal for photosynthesis, and understand how limiting factors affect oxygen production.

     

10. Describe how cells and organisms acquire and release energy (photosynthesis, chemosynthesis, cellular respiration and fermentation).
  1. Photosynthesis Animation
    This is an excellent interactive animated movie that covers all the details of photosynthesis. Helpful labels and narration explain the process in great detail.
  2. Illuminating Photosynthesis
    This interactive site covers photosynthesis in three activities. First, there is a simple animation that shows the cycle of oxygen and carbon dioxide between plants and animals (suitable for younger grades). Second there is a great animation explaining photosynthesis on an atomic level (for older students). Third there is a quiz covering these topics.
11. Explain that living organisms use matter and energy to synthesize a variety of organic molecules (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids) and to drive life processes (e.g., growth, reacting to the environment, reproduction and movement).  
12. Describe that biological classification represents how organisms are related with species being the most fundamental unit of the classification system. Relate how organisms are arranged into a hierarchy of groups and subgroups based on similarities and differences that reflect their evolutionary relationships.  
13. Explain that the variation of organisms within a species increases the likelihood that at least some members of a species will survive under gradually changing environmental conditions.
  1. Microevolution-
    Observe the effect of predators on a diverse population of parrots. The initial percentages and fitness levels of each genotype can be set. Determine how initial fitness levels affect genotype and allele frequencies through several generations. Test predictions about what initial conditions lead to equilibrium, and which lead to extinction.

     

14. Relate diversity and adaptation to structures and their functions in living organisms (e.g., adaptive radiation).
  1. Virtual Skeleton   This is another outstanding website that will allow you to see the human body.   A Must see website.
  2. Evolution: Mutation and Selection-
    Observe evolution in a fictional population of bugs. Set the background to any color, and see natural selection taking place. Inheritance of color occurs according to Mendel's laws and probability. Mutations occur at random, and probability of capture by predators is determined by the insect's camouflage.
  3. Natural Selection-You are a bird hunting moths (both dark and light) that live on trees. As you capture the moths most easily visible against the tree surface, the moth populations change, illustrating the effects of natural selection.
  4. Rainfall and Bird Beaks-Study the thickness of birds' beaks over a five year period as you control the yearly rainfall on an isolated island. As the environmental conditions change, the species must adapt (a real?world consequence) to avoid extinction.
     
15. Explain how living things interact with biotic and a biotic components of the environment (e.g., predation, competition, natural disasters and weather).  
16. Relate how distribution and abundance of organisms and populations in ecosystems are limited by the ability of the ecosystem to recycle materials and the availability of matter, space and energy.  
17. Conclude that ecosystems tend to have cyclic fluctuations around a state of approximate equilibrium that can change when climate changes, when one or more new species appear as a result of immigration or when one or more species disappear.  
18. Describe ways that human activities can deliberately or inadvertently alter the equilibrium in ecosystems. Explain how changes in technology/biotechnology can cause significant changes, either positive or negative, in environmental quality and carrying capacity.
  1. Biomes of the World
    This site has loads of information and pictures on six biomes and six ecosystems of the world. This is a very in depth but useful site!
  2. Rabbit Population by Season-Observe the population of rabbits in an environment over many years. The land available to the rabbits can be adjusted, as well as the weather conditions, in order to compare the effects of urban sprawl and unusual weather on wildlife populations.
  3. Water Pollution-Get to know the four main types of pollution present in the environment, and then look at a variety of real?world examples as you try to guess what type of pollution is represented by each situation. All of the real?world situations can be viewed every day in different parts of the world.
19. Illustrate how uses of resources at local, state, regional, national, and global levels have affected the quality of life (e.g., energy production, sustainable vs. nonsustainable agriculture).  
20. Recognize that a change in gene frequency (genetic composition) in a population over time is a foundation of biological evolution.
  1. Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium-Set the initial percentages of three types of parrots in a population and track changes in genotype and allele frequency through several generations. Analyze population data to develop an understanding of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Determine how initial allele percentages will affect the equilibrium state of the population.
  2. Microevolution -Observe the effect of predators on a diverse population of parrots. The initial percentages and fitness levels of each genotype can be set. Determine how initial fitness levels affect genotype and allele frequencies through several generations. Test predictions about what initial conditions lead to equilibrium, and which lead to extinction.
21. Explain that natural selection provides the following mechanism for evolution; undirected variation in inherited characteristics exist within every species. These characteristics may give individuals an advantage or disadvantage compared to others in surviving and reproducing. The advantaged offspring are more likely to survive and reproduce. Therefore, the proportion of individuals that have advantageous characteristics will increase. When an environment changes, the survival value of some inherited characteristics may change.
  1. Evolution: Mutation and Selection-Observe evolution in a fictional population of bugs. Set the background to any color, and see natural selection taking place. Inheritance of color occurs according to Mendel's laws and probability. Mutations occur at random, and probability of capture by predators is determined by the insect's camouflage.
  2. Microevolution-Observe the effect of predators on a diverse population of parrots. The initial percentages and fitness levels of each genotype can be set. Determine how initial fitness levels affect genotype and allele frequencies through several generations. Test predictions about what initial conditions lead to equilibrium, and which lead to extinction.
  3. Natural Selection-You are a bird hunting moths (both dark and light) that live on trees. As you capture the moths most easily visible against the tree surface, the moth populations change, illustrating the effects of natural selection.
  4. Rainfall and Bird Beaks -Study the thickness of birds' beaks over a five year period as you control the yearly rainfall on an isolated island. As the environmental conditions change, the species must adapt (a real?world consequence) to avoid extinction.
     
22. Describe historical scientific developments that occurred in evolutionary thought (e.g., Lamarck and Darwin, Mendelian Genetics and modern synthesis).
  1.  Rainfall and Bird Beaks-Study the thickness of birds' beaks over a five year period as you control the yearly rainfall on an isolated island. As the environmental conditions change, the species must adapt (a real?world consequence) to avoid extinction.
23. Describe how scientists continue to investigate and critically analyze aspects of evolutionary theory. (The intent of this indicator does not mandate the teaching or testing of intelligent design.)
  1. GeoSciences  Virtual Museum of Fossils You will discover what appears to be an outstanding website for investigation.            4 Star
24. Analyze how natural selection and other evolutionary mechanisms (e.g. genetic drift, immigration, emigration, mutation) and their consequences provide a scientific explanation for the diversity and unity of past life forms, as depicted in the fossil record, and present life forms.
  1. Evolution: Mutation and Selection-Observe evolution in a fictional population of bugs. Set the background to any color, and see natural selection taking place. Inheritance of color occurs according to Mendel's laws and probability. Mutations occur at random, and probability of capture by predators is determined by the insect's camouflage.
  2. Microevolution-Observe the effect of predators on a diverse population of parrots. The initial percentages and fitness levels of each genotype can be set. Determine how initial fitness levels affect genotype and allele frequencies through several generations. Test predictions about what initial conditions lead to equilibrium, and which lead to extinction.
  3. Natural Selection-You are a bird hunting moths (both dark and light) that live on trees. As you capture the moths most easily visible against the tree surface, the moth populations change, illustrating the effects of natural selection.
  4. Rainfall and Bird Beaks -Study the thickness of birds' beaks over a five year period as you control the yearly rainfall on an isolated island. As the environmental conditions change, the species must adapt (a real?world consequence) to avoid extinction.
25. Explain that life on Earth is thought to have begun as simple, one celled organisms approximately 4 billion years ago. During most of the history of Earth only single celled microorganisms existed, but once cells with nuclei developed about a billion years ago, increasingly complex multicellular organisms evolved.
  1. GeoSciences  Virtual Museum of Fossils You will discover what appears to be an outstanding website for investigation.            4 Star
26. Use historical examples to explain how new ideas are limited by the context in which they are conceived. These ideas are often rejected by the scientific establishment; sometimes spring from unexpected findings; and usually grow slowly, through contributions from many different investigators (e.g., biological evolution, germ theory, biotechnology, discovering germs).
  1. Details: Human Karyotyping  Sort and pair the images of human chromosomes obtained in a scan. Find differences in the scans of the various patients to find out specific things that can cause disease, as well as the gender of the person.
27. Describe advances in life sciences that have important long-lasting effects on science and society (e.g., biological evolution, germ theory, biotechnology, discovering germs).  
28. Analyze and investigate emerging scientific issues (e.g., genetically modified food, stem cell research, genetic research, cloning).
  1. Articles on Human Cloning
    This web site offers a collection of articles about human cloning, including those in favor, those opposed, and general information.

Physical Sciences
Science and Technology

1. Cite examples of ways that scientific inquiry is driven by the desire to understand the natural world and how technology is driven by the need to meet human needs and solve human problems.  
2. Describe examples of scientific advances and emerging technologies and how they may impact society  
3. Explain that when evaluating a design for a device or process, thought should be given to how it will be manufactured, operated, maintained, replaced and disposed of in addition to who will sell, operate and take care of it. Explain how the costs associated with these considerations may introduce additional constraints on the design.  

Scientific Inquiry

1. Research and apply appropriate safety precautions when designing and conducting scientific investigations (e.g. OSHA, MSDS, eyewash, goggles, ventilation).
  1. The Material Safety Data Sheet Quiz
    This quiz contains seven parts. In each section you will read some background material about OSHA-required content, consult an MSDS sheet, and then answer a few questions. You must complete one section in order to move on to the next one.
    (Submitted by: Steve Wheeler)
  2. Fire Extinguisher Training
    Module from Oklahoma State University offering a guided tutorial and quiz over the proper use of fire extinguishers. Ideal for safety training for the Science or Vocational lab.
    (Submitted by: Steve Wheeler)
2. Present scientific findings using clear language, accurate data, appropriate graphs, tables, maps and available technology.  
3. Use mathematical models to predict and analyze natural phenomena.  
4. Draw conclusions from inquiries based on scientific knowledge and principles, the use of logic and evidence (data) from investigations.  
5. Explain how new scientific data can cause any existing scientific explanation to be supported, revised or rejected.  

Scientific Ways of Knowing

1. Discuss science as a dynamic body of knowledge that can lead to the development of entirely new disciplines.  
2. Describe that scientists may disagree about explanations of phenomena, about interpretation of data or about the value of rival theories, but they do agree that questioning, response to criticism and open communication are integral to the process of science.  
3. Recognize that science is a systematic method of continuing investigation, based on observation, hypothesis testing, measurement, experimentation, and theory building, which leads to more adequate explanations of natural phenomena.  
5. Recognize that research involving voluntary human subjects should be conducted only with the informed consent of the subjects and follow rigid guidelines and/or laws.  
6. Recognize that animal-based research must be conducted according to currently accepted professional standards and laws.  
7. Investigate how the knowledge, skills and interests learned in science classes apply to the careers students plan to pursue.